Introduction

Instructional videos are a great way to learn more about the game & develop skills.

Videos are downloaded and saved on Google Drive.

Enjoy !

10 day chess challenge

Louis Holtzhausen (Chessfox.com) presents a 10 day chess challenge to develop your evaluation & calculation - excellent training for visualisation skills.:

Day 1:
Video 1   How to calculate chess tactics  (9:10 min)
Video 2   How to calculate tactics - exercises  (5:36 min)

Day 2:
Video 3   How to evaluate a position  (15:21 min)
Video 4   How to evaluate a position - exercises  (7:26 min)

Day 3:
Video 5  Calculation exercises  (6:02 min)

Day 4:
Video 6  Calculation exercises  (8:03 min)

Day 5:
Video 7  Calculation exercises  (6:30 min)

Day 6:
Video 8  Calculation exercises  (6:00 min)

Day 7:
Video 9  Calculation exercises  (7:46 min)

Day 8:
Video 10  Calculation exercises  (6:43 min)

Day 9:
Video 11  Calculation exercises  (8:10 min)

Day 10:
Video 12  Calculation exercises  (6:53 min)
Video 13  Evaluation exercises  (6:52 min)

IM Daniel Rensch

IM Daniel Rensch from Chess.com - instructional videos

Video 1   The Opening

Video 2   Tactics & Strategy - Middlegame

Video 3   Endgame

Video 4   Bringing it all Together

Video 5   Start Playing - basics for beginners

Middlegame strategy

Kevin from Chess Network outlines some useful strategic thinking for the middlegame

Video 1   Trading pieces - Part 1

Video 2   Trading pieces - Part 2

Miniatures

A miniature is a short game (up to 25 moves). Usually only decisive games (not draws) are considered miniatures. Ideally, a miniature should not be spoiled by an obvious blunder by the losing side. A miniature may also qualify for a brilliancy prize in a tournament.

Miniatures end with clever attacking combinations.

Mato Jelic  has presented a wonderful collection of miniature games with instructive commentary.
At times he invites you to pause the video to consider the next move.

Video 1        Video 2        Video 3

How does a computer play chess ?

Chess seems like a distinctly human activity, requiring intelligence and thought, so how can a computer possibly do it?

Computers don't really "play" chess like people do. A computer that is playing chess is not "thinking." Instead, it is calculating through a set of formulas that cause it to make good moves. 
- adapted from HowStuffWorks.com

Video
The video starts with an explanation of how a computer plays a simple game of fiddlesticks. It then looks at more complex 'thinking' (approx 5 min)

X chess championship

Eight top-rating teenagers compete against each other in a championship with a time limit of 15 minutes each.

Each video is presented with very good commentary & analysis of moves by expert players as games are played.
4 videos each approx 26 mins in length.

Video 1   begins with a short introduction about how pieces move & then straight into the games

Video 2

Video 3

Video 4

Queen of Katwe

From living in the streets in the slums of Katwe, Uganda, to learning chess in a Sports Outreach Institute missionary program to becoming one of her nation’s top chess players competing in international competitions, Phiona Mutesi has come a long way from the 9-year old girl who came for a cup of porridge. “Queen of Katwe,” which is soon to be made into a Disney movie, Phiona is an inspiration to millions, and especially to girls in a nation where girls are particularly marginalized.

Video   official trailer of the Disney movie (approx 4 min)